webinar

NA00102-f: Great Lakes Currents

Thursday, January 28, 2021
REGISTER FOR WEBINAR
$20.00
Webinar date: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021
8:00 PM Eastern Time

Member discounts processed during checkout.

To register for this webinar, click the Add to Cart button, then checkout from the Cart page. Price is in US Dollars and includes the recording available after the webinar completes.

During checkout you will first need to login, or complete a free enrollment if you have not registered yet.

DESCRIPTION
Instructor: 
Webinar date: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021
8:00 PM Eastern Time
Yes there ARE currents in the Great Lakes, and today's animated satellite-based current charts can assist in route planning! Whether you're a long-distance Great Lakes cruiser or a sailboat racer you'll find this webinar extremely useful.

More than 100 years ago the Weather Service charted prevailing currents in all of the Great Lakes. Today's satellite-based analyisys and imagery bring up to the minute information on Great Lakes currents to everyone for both cruise and race planning. Interestingly, the century-old analyses, current observations by Great Lakes Mariners over the years, and today's regularly-updated satellite-based current data are all in remarkable alignnment. Prevailing winds and the outflow of water to the ocean effect these systems. Where currents exist their speed can reach from one to as much as four knots, more than sufficient to influence both passage times and fuel economy.

Using both historic analyses and modern satelite imagery, experienced Great Lakes sailor, Niels Jensen, explains the prevailing currents in each of the five Great Lakes in this significantly updated webinar based on today's latest imaging technology. Boaters engaging in long-distance Great Lakes cruising, as well as sailboat racing, will find today's on-line current charts of particular interest. In addition to their affect on passage times, Niels will examine how currents also interact with winds to create certain wave phenomena. The best known of these is the wind-against-current situation, which can quickly generate dangerous conditions that, for the comfort and safety of their crew, captains of small recreational craft should well understand.